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Full Year Courses

All full year courses are worth 1 Carnegie Credit. These courses span the entire fall and spring semesters ending in May. Students will be given a fall semester and spring Semester grade.

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Advanced Mathematics (Pre–Calculus)

Advanced Math Pre-Calculus is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to extend their knowledge of mathematics in preparation for Calculus. This course includes elements of Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry.

MathXL, an internet based program, will be used for assignments, quizzes, and tests. This program provides immediate feedback; learning aids such as associated videos and “Help Me Solve This;” and extended opportunities for practice. Mastery of each set of assignments is required to ensure comprehension of the material. Discussion boards will be used to provide a forum for students to ask for help from the online instructor and by his/her peers.

Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II

Algebra I

Algebra I is a foundation mathematics course that focuses on developing an understanding of fundamental algebraic ideas in realistic settings. A primary goal of this course is to use pattern recognition and analysis, as well as data collection and analysis, to demonstrate how algebra connects mathematics and the real world.

MathXL for School will be used to complete assigned problems from each lesson as well as take quizzes and tests. This program provides immediate feedback; learning aids such as associated videos and “Help Me Solve This;” and extended opportunities to practice math skills. Mastery of each set of assignments is required to ensure comprehension of the material. Discussion boards will be used to provide a forum for students to ask for help from the online instructor and from peers.

Prerequisites: None

Algebra II

Algebra II continues the study of linear, quadratic, and exponential functions from previous courses as well as limited study of rational and radical functions. Students will model situations and solve equations, involving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solve exponential equations using the properties of logarithms.

MathXL for School, an internet based program, will be used to complete assigned problems from each lesson as well as take quizzes and tests. This program provides immediate feedback; learning aids such as associated videos and “Help Me Solve This;” and extended opportunities to practice math skills. Mastery of each set of assignments is required to ensure comprehension of the material.

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Calculus

The first part of this course will review the major concepts from Advanced Math and earlier mathematics course. Classes of functions and their properties will be emphasized. It is important that students have a good understanding of functions and how to describe them algebraically, graphically and numerically.

Students are then introduced to the major concepts of calculus. The topics covered are approximately the same as on the AP Calculus AB syllabus, although not in quite the detail required to take the AP exam. The course does contain enough optional material that a well-prepared student could be ready to take the AP exam.

Specifically, students will develop an understanding of the derivative as a rate of change and a local linear approximation of a function. They will learn to understand the definite integral as the limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of changes. They will understand the relationship between derivatives and definite integrals as given the the Fundamental Theorems of Calculus. They will be able to differentiate and evaluate definite integrals involving polynomial, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. These tools will also be used to solve a wide variety of problems, including solving simple differential equations.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the following: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and Advanced Math

Civics

Civics is the study of government and civic responsibility. This course will introduce students to the concepts and processes involved in the American government. Students will learn how the U.S. government functions at all levels, discover and evaluate their role in the government as an American citizenship, and examine current issues, political parties, the U.S. legal system, economics and foreign policy as related to American government.

Prerequisites – none

Earth Science

This course will be a journey into the field of earth science. Students will look at where they are in the universe, what the earth is made of, what causes natural disasters, how the earth cycles, and human impacts on the earth. The four major fields of Earth Science that we will cover are astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography.

The student will demonstrate ways of thinking and acting inherent in the practice of science. The student will use the language and instruments of science to collect, organize, interpret, calculate, and communicate information. The student will use a variety of resources to identify techniques used to investigate Earth and the Universe.

Prerequisites: none

Fine Arts Survey

Fine Arts Survey is a journey through the development of Western Art from prehistory to the 20th century. Students will experience the wonders of human creativity. They learn about the the social, cultural, and historical influences within visual art, music, and theater. Students will learn about each of these art forms through specific works of art, artists, composers, and playwrights of the various time periods. Their individual creativity will be expressed through several interpretive assignments.

Prerequisites: None

French I

Bienvenue mes amis in Cajun French, Parisian French and Canadian French… it all ties into the culture of Louisiana

French I is a beginning level course for students in grades 8-12. No prior experience in French is required. The course is centered on topics linked to content standards and tied to real-life situations. The students will learn the basics of the French language by using a variety of multimedia materials such as video clips, audio conversations, vocabulary presentations, pronunciation, and written conversation.

Prerequisites: None

French II

Do you have French-speaking family members or have you ever wondered how the French history of Louisiana fits in with the rest of the French-speaking world?

This online French II course is intended to provide an alternative way for you as a Louisiana high school student to continue your education in French for a second year. It provides not only the means to enhance your speaking, listening, reading and writing abilities, but also a look at francophone (French-speaking) culture in places you might not expect to find it — Africa, for example. Students, you will visit places via the Internet that you've only heard of…and, as a matter of fact, some that you haven't heard of. And you’ll see where French here in Louisiana fits into the big picture of French around the world!

Prerequisites: French I at the high school level or equivalent.

Geometry

Geometry is the study of visual patterns and the use of these patterns to describe the physical universe. Course topics include methods of reasoning, construction, the coordinate plane, transformations, and types of measurement. Properties and applications of lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, and similarity will be studied.

MathXL for School, an internet based program, will be used to complete assigned problems from each lesson as well as take quizzes and tests. This program provides immediate feedback; learning aids such as associated videos and “Help Me Solve This;” and extended opportunities to practice math skills. Mastery of each set of assignments is required to ensure comprehension of the material. Individual instructor-student feedback will be provided as the student achieves mastery of the lesson objectives. Discussion boards will be used to provide a forum for students to ask for help from the online instructor and by his/her peers.

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Latin I

Latin I is an introduction to the study of the Latin language and the culture of Ancient Rome. There are no Ancient Romans alive for us to communicate with today. Therefore, we will read, write, speak, and listen to their language in order to enter the minds of the people that have left a legacy that continues to influence the modern world today.

The course is structured to help each student achieve success. Students in this class will learn the fundamentals of Latin grammar with an emphasis on having fun! Rest assured that we will use a pacing appropriate for elementary Latin and that the instructor will guide you by highlighting the most important concepts found in the textbook. Grammatical topics to be covered include the five main cases of nouns, 1st and 2nd declension nouns, 1st/2nd declension adjectives, active and passive indicative of all conjugations and tenses of verbs, the indicative of sum and possum, infinitives, selected uses of the ablative, dative and genitive, personal pronouns, possessive adjectives, personal pronouns and the intensive pronoun. Cultural topics to be covered include Roman names, Roman mythology, early Roman history, Roman architecture, Roman culture, Latin mottoes and phrases, and Latin literature.

Prerequisites: None

Latin II

Latin II is a continuation of the study of the Latin language and the culture of Ancient Rome. There are no Ancient Romans alive for us to communicate with today. Therefore, we will read, write, speak, and listen to their language in order to enter the minds of the people that have left a legacy that continues to influence the modern world today.

The course is structured to help each student achieve success. Students in this class will learn advanced concepts of Latin grammar and syntax. Since the students in this class may have different Latin I backgrounds, we will begin the course with a review of elementary Latin grammar and vocabulary. By the end of the course, students should have a basic understanding of the Latin language and be able to read simple Latin prose. Grammar topics in this course include comparative and superlative forms of adjectives and adverbs, demonstrative, relative and interrogative pronouns, participles, indirect statements, the passive voice, deponent verbs and an introduction to the subjunctive mood. Cultural topics to be covered include the Olympics, the early history of Rome, gladiators, Roman marriage, the Forum Romanum, slavery in ancient Rome, selected Greek/Roman myths, Latin mottoes, Roman roads, Roman baths, and Roman government.

Prerequisites: Latin I

Physics

This is a full year physics course, not a conceptual physic course. Student will use virtual physics labs to simulate physic properties and calculations. Simulated labs provide opportunities to explore concepts more extensively and efficiently than a traditional physics class.

Physics is a broad term for man’s attempt to understand and predict the world around him. The course includes the study of forces and motion, energy and work, waves and sound, light and optics, electricity and magnetism. We will study types of motion, from atoms to planets. We will study energy and its sources, from nuclear energy to the breakfast you ate. We will start to gain an understanding of how cell phones and radios work. In short this overview course will touch on most physics topics while tying physics to your daily lives.

Prerequisites: Classification as a junior or senior, Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II, Completion of two science courses (Physical Science, Biology, Chemistry)

Spanish I

Spanish I is a beginning-level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of language learning. In this course, the student will gain listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through interactive and entertaining multimedia activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction. Students will learn about topics familiar to them, including family, academic, and social life, in an intercultural context.

Prerequisites: None

Spanish II

Spanish II is a continuation of a beginning-level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of language learning. In this course, the student will hone their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction. Throughout the ten units of material, students will learn to express themselves using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind.

Prerequisites: Spanish I

Spanish III

In this global society, learning Spanish at an advanced level is an invaluable tool to equip students for the social and professional demands of today.

Spanish III is a continuation of Spanish II and is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn advanced conversation and writing skills. The student will continue to hone speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills through individual and group activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction.

Prerequisites: Spanish II

World History

World History is a record of the adventures of humankind throughout thousands of years. This course will emphasize geography and the human story of world events. Attention to the interaction of geography and history will help one understand how and why events unfolded and put the effect of individuals into perspective. Group projects will be incorporated throughout the course to create a sense of community and promote the exchange of ideas. Reading, writing, critical thinking, and map skills will be developed by utilizing various online sources and software programs.

Prerequisites: None